Are you wondering where does everyone get their fabric? It seems very expensive in some online shops. So where do they buy fabrics?

top-fabric-suppliers-according-to-etsy-sellersToday I checked the forums and gathered interesting suggestions of Etsy sellers about where they get high quality and inexpensive fabrics.

Lorraine from LorDelLinens
JoBerry Fabrics here on Etsy has some very reasonable prices and a wonderful selection. Also there is Fabric.com, if you spend over $35 I think, you get free shipping.

Heather Christensen from SweetBabyJaneCo
Another vote for fabric.com! They have some great sales.

Kim Fluck from kimzkraftkorner
I recently bought fabric from a new (new to me) place called www.neverenoughfabric.com and was very pleased with what I got and the prices were very reasonable.

Susanne Pedersen from BenneboKids
Hawthornethreads.com and fabric.com

Naturel Mistik from NaturelMistik
www.fabrics-store.com
www.aknfabrics.com
www.fashionfabricsclub.com

Carol from JustMeToo
I only use premium quality quilt cotton. Small amounts I purchase online from equilter, elkabees fabric paradise, fabric.com, and sometimes on etsy.

Alanna Whitestar
Try OnlineFabricStore.com. Their fabrics appear to be reasonably good.

Jen from pollyfoofoo
I don’t do a lot of sewing, but when I do, I look here in etsy. I also look at superbuzzy.com and spoonflower.com – not the cheapest venues, but they have such cute stuff.

Eline from VolcanoGoods
Since I mostly use cotton canvas, I buy my fabric at bigduckcanvas.com, they’re great! Prices are reasonable (cheaper than Joann’s duck canvas) and they have great deals for buying bulk!

To sum it all, Fabric.com is a crowd favourite followed by Etsy, Joann’s, Ebay, Hobby Lobby and Hancock.

If you are new to sewing, I would advise that you get a couple of remnants from your local fabric store. Choose thin cotton fabric to start. If you like it and get good at it, then you can start spending more money. I hate to see anyone buying a lot of expensive supplies when they are just trying out a new craft. See if you are going to like it, first! Then branch out and try other fabrics.

Also, don’t use hard stuff like denim or canvass on your new machine if it is a home-use machine. They can bend the works unless you have a commercial machine. Also be careful sewing on patches and emblems. They can mess up your home sewing machine as well! Most artists do them by hand.

How about you? Where did you get your fabrics? Please share it with us in the comment box below.

Gary Capps

I live in the one of the most beautiful places in the world on the Sunshine Coast in Australia with my wife and our 2 dogs, Poppy and Mia. Since 2009 I have helped over 15,000 handmade business owners to grow their business with our software and free tools designed for todays entrepreneurial artisan.

Related Posts

  • 20 Groups Every Etsy Seller Should Join20 Groups Every Etsy Seller Should Join Are you participating in any online groups? There is a virtually endless number of groups one could join centered on nearly every topic imaginable, and […]
  • Key To Pricing For Your Handmade ProductsKey To Pricing For Your Handmade Products Putting a price on your work is one of the most intimidating first steps to selling. Why? There are a lot of pricing formulas suggested around the web […]
  • Meylah – What You Need To KnowMeylah – What You Need To Know Are you looking for another marketplace platform aside from Etsy and Artfire that is for FREE? If yes, there is Meylah, an online market place for handmade […]
  • Ebay Crafts – What You Need To KnowEbay Crafts – What You Need To Know For most craft lovers, finding a large variety of craft supplies in one place is necessary and Ebay is a perfect place for that. Ebay offers a massive […]

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply