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You will never get paid for all of your labor! There will always be someone who will sell cheaper than you! And every venue has its own price points.

craft-fairs-and-online-marketplaces-pricing-tipsSo how do you price your items for sale at craft fairs or online sites like Etsy?

To be fair, a formula isn’t the only factor you should look at when determining price, but it can really open your eyes to the true costs of doing business, and the approximate price you need to strive for to make a real profit.

A good craft pricing formula will…

  1. take the guess-work out of assigning a price
  2. help prevent emotions from clouding your judgment
  3. ensure you have factored all of your costs into your prices
  4. give your business room to grow and be truly profitable
  5. help you discover opportunities for increasing profitability and reducing waste

Here’s how to price your Items for craft fairs or online sites like Etsy by Melanie Ham:

If the process of calculating the price of your products becomes too complicated, you could use a software program such as Craft Maker Pro where you can keep track of various aspects of your craft business and calculate costs of finished items.

You can also use our free pricing calculator.

Gary Capps

I live in the one of the most beautiful places in the world on the Sunshine Coast in Australia with my wife and our 2 dogs, Poppy and Mia. Since 2009 I have helped over 15,000 handmade business owners to grow their business with our software and free tools designed for todays entrepreneurial artisan.

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3 Responses to “Craft Fairs And Online Marketplaces Pricing Tips”

  1. Susan D. 30. Dec, 2016 at 9:40 pm #

    I would think that time making a necklace would not just be stringing the beads, but also time designing it. I don’t use a simple 2 bead alternating pattern. It’s much more complicated. Yes ?

  2. Judi 27. Dec, 2016 at 6:56 pm #

    I recently participated in a Holiday Marketplace and was competing with individuals selling factory-made items at $5 a pop. My prices started at $8 and went to $35 depending on the quality/cost of materials and complexity of fabrication. I was told by the coordinator that there would be other booths with jewelry but theirs was very different than mine. I was unaware they would be selling so cheap! I had committed to three weekends and my net profit was under $100. Hard lesson learned. Do your research! Next time I will find out as much as I can and will probably stick to handmade ONLY markets.

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