Naming your craft business is probably one of the most daunting and exciting things to do in your early days. I mean, let’s face it…. It’s going to be yours for a long time and changing it in the future is not always a good option.

business-nameSometimes it’s also hard to choose something that will convey the feeling you want for your business. Not to fret, we’re going to help you come up with a name for your business.

Show Off Your Creative Mind!

Make a list of your hobby or field of interest. Setting them out in a mind-map-stroke-spider-diagram (Check MindMeister for mind mapping) format might trigger off names that really get to the heart of what you’re about as a business.

You can also do it manually. At the top of one piece of paper write “What I do?”. Write down all the words you can think of to describe your craft. For example:

  • crochet
  • jewelry
  • knit
  • weave
  • embroidery
  • yarn
  • thread
  • cotton
  • stitch

On the second list mark, “Who I am?”. Make a list of all the words you can think of that best describes you.

  • artistic
  • expressive
  • lively
  • creative
  • hippy
  • colorful
  • original

You can also make a few other sheets, such as your favorite colors, favorite tools, etc.

The more lists the better. What you are doing here is making a list that represents YOU and YOUR CRAFT.

Avoid Odd Spellings!

If you want your business’ name website to be seo-friendly, make sure that the spelling can easily be found. It may look cool, but it’s hard to remember how to spell something if it’s written a different way.

Also, don’t give your customers a hard time understanding your business name. There are exceptions (we’re looking at you, Etsy!) where a nonsense name that doesn’t bear any relation to the business works, but generally if you need to spend your entire elevator pitch explaining your name proposition, it’s best to go back to the drawing board.

You can also use keyword research in naming your business where you can pick popular keywords to incorporate to your business name. Please check our guide here in doing keyword research.

Forget Geography!

Your location is a part of your story, but it doesn’t necessarily dictate your business name. Generally, putting a location in your business name can suggest a preference for remaining local, or only serving local customers. Don’t limit your potential by setting geographical constraints.

Stand Out!

Ask your friends and family’s advice before you hastily get those business cards printed. Similarly, some craft business owners go for words they think describe the nature or niche of their business. “Angie’s creative designs” is descriptive enough, the problem is there are tons more people doing the same thing, so stand out from the crowd and steer clear from overused words and phrases.

Research

Check the name online to make sure that nobody is using that business name. When creating a website you really need an uncomplicated URL (Web address) without hyphens or underscores. Avoid this search at your risk! If someone else has the same name as you, it’s quite likely that THEY will get the business NOT you!  So you could be missing out on sales.

Aside from making a research for your future business name, you might also be interested to do a some market research to make your craft business successful.

Trademark!

This may not be necessary, but you might be interested in doing it. If after you have gone through this process and you have the most epic name possible, you’ll want to make it yours and prevent others in too similar a line of work from piggybacking on your future success! So consider making an application for a trademark so you have the original rights to use it.

Don’t forget to come up with a tagline for your arts or crafts business. A tagline is a short descriptive slogan or phrase about your business. A good tagline is memorable, witty and somewhat descriptive of your product.

There it is!

You are now ready to make a professional-looking website.

You might also be interested to start marketing your business. Let me give you our very own guide on 30 free ways to promote your craft business online.

Even if you haven’t got a website yet… with the way marketing is these days, it’s more likely that you will have one in the future!

Gary Capps

I live in the one of the most beautiful places in the world on the Sunshine Coast in Australia with my wife and our 2 dogs, Poppy and Mia. Since 2009 I have helped over 15,000 handmade business owners to grow their business with our software and free tools designed for todays entrepreneurial artisan.

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4 Responses to “How To Choose A Name For Your Craft Business”

  1. MD Handfield 15. Jan, 2016 at 3:54 am #

    Some good points in the article, however I network with a lot of crafters who have switched the type of things they do.

    Naming your business after the type of craft you currently do is not optimal. Example, if someone goes with the company name “Angie’s Crochet” and now only creates vinyl on wood signs it makes absolutely no sense. It is better to go with a name like “Angie’s Creative Designs” or “Angie’s Artifacts”.

    It takes a lot of money to legally register a business, purchase rights to a trade name and then build a brand. So much better to have an all-encompassing name than to have a name that backs you into one type of craft.

    • admin 15. Jan, 2016 at 5:42 am #

      A good point, but having your brand of craft in your name may be very beneficial if you really want to carve out a niche for your self.

      If you suddenly change to doing another type of craft I would firstly question why that is being done as flip flopping from one thing to another may not be good for business continuity.

  2. MD Handfield 15. Jan, 2016 at 3:54 am #

    Some good points in the article, however I network with a lot of crafters who have switched the type of things they do.

    Naming your business after the type of craft you currently do is not optimal. Example, if someone goes with the company name “Angie’s Crochet” and now only creates vinyl on wood signs it makes absolutely no sense. It is better to go with a name like “Angie’s Creative Designs” or “Angie’s Artifacts”.

    It takes a lot of money to legally register a business, purchase rights to a trade name and then build a brand. So much better to have an all-encompassing name than to have a name that backs you into one type of craft.

    • Gary Capps 28. Jan, 2016 at 5:11 am #

      A very valid point, but I would be more worried that they are chopping and changing business model to start with more than the name change. That would suggest they weren’t clear on where they were going in the first place.

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